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Saturday, March 24, 2018

The Question that Matters


Q:        What is the most significant dimension of your life?

A:        My Relationships,
                        Shared Experience


We are relational beings.

We are…beings in relationship.

I am not, without you.

Our relationships with all people, whether they are known to us, or unknown, no matter distant from us in space and time, these relationships form the most significant dimension of our lives.

Our relationships are significant because they touch on who we are, not what we are doing, or where we are going, they concern our personhood.

Think of Adam, who was just an object made from clay prior to the coming of Eve. He was merely adamah, the one who comes from soil, a sad and lonely thing.

He awoke one day to find himself face to face with Eve, a woman, at that point Adam becomes man, a being in relationship, his status is exalted, and before her coming he was nothing more than animated soil.

It is relationality that confers dignity on the human person.

Remember the Zulu word Ubuntu, meaning; I am because you are. Without you I am not, not the same person.

Whoever you are, wherever you might be, you have contributed to the fullness of my being, like the pattern that ensues from the beating of a butterfly’s wings, it reaches everything, and we are tied together like an infinitude of strings, connected beyond space and time.

Our relationships are diagrammable, as complex and vast as a Mandelbrot Set.

Between any one point in time and space, and every other point in time and space there is a relationship that can be distinguished, a line of continuity that may be drawn.

Relationality is a dimension of our lives, properly speaking, of our ontological structure; like the dimensions of space and time, and mass.

We must be cognizant of this, our wholeness depends on it.

Bad relationships ulcerate within us, good relationships are like a healing balm.

Good and bad relationships are not a zero-sum game, the good and the bad can exist in the same relationship at the same time. The presence of the good does not eliminate the bad, neither does the bad obviate the good.

We are called to mindfulness when considering our relationships, because relationality is complex, multi-valenced and it is the fundamental ground of our being.