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Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Awake


The sun pours through glass
The light on my face draws me
From my unconscious

Clear, the rising sun
Brushing away the blue night
With its warming rays

Sunday, March 29, 2020

A Homily - The Fifth Sunday of Lent (Year A)


Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 129(130) ©
Second Reading – Romans 8:8-11 ©
Gospel Acclamation – John 11:25, 26
The Gospel According to John 11:1 - 45 ©

(NJB)

The Fifth Sunday of Lent (Year A)


Listen!

The bounds of death are no impediment for God’s salvific will. God will transit any threshold to save, God will pierce any darkness to save God’s children.

Know this:

God, the creator of the universe, God is patient, God is loving and God is kind.

God is the spirit of mercy and of justice. Take comfort in the knowledge that God’s justice is never present without God’s mercy, as God’s wrath is never present without God’s.

Learn from God; become like God: be loving, be merciful, be patient, and show kindness to all.

Do not fall into the error of the Apostle.

Be mindful!

Saint Paul misses an important point in the reading for today; he makes a grievous error.

Know this:

The spirit of God lives in all people. There is no question about it. God, the creator of the universe, the God of Jesus Christ, God dwells in all people.

Do not doubt it. We are all God’s children, and God loves every single one of us. There is no exception.

The spirit of Jesus lives in all people. We are all related to Jesus, he is our brother. Our relationship to Jesus is an ontological reality that cannot be abridged or denied. We do not have the power to undo it. 

Our relationship to God and Jesus is a determinative factor in the nature of our being, as all of our relationships are, no matter how remote or distant from us in time and space they might be.

Do not forget this.

Consider the Gospel for today and be mindful. God is not served by a false narrative such as the narrative we are presented with in today’s reading. Therefore, we must use reason to find a different meaning than the meaning which the narrative plainly delineates.

The story of Lazarus is pure myth, Jesus did not call a corpse from the tomb. The story is either a complete fabrication, or Lazarus was not quite dead when he heard Jesus call him.

We must find the metaphor in the text, because to read it plainly is to subscribe to a lie, which goes against the principles of the Church.

In John the Lazarus narrative became convoluted by politics and the ongoing disputes John’s community had with the Jewish people they lived in proximity to, who they were doing everything in their power to distinguish themselves from.

In John the narrative goes to the issue of who people believe Jesus was, the Christ the Son of God, rather than who he actually was and what he actually taught.

For John’s community it was more important to believe the Church’s dogma, than to live according to Jesus’s teachings, in this way they were no different from the Pharisees and hypocrites Jesus struggled with.

In the end, only our conduct matters, not what believe about Jesus, or his power to raise the dead.

In the end what matters is that we fill ourselves with the spirit that desires to see everyone filled with life and wellbeing.

The metaphor is this: We are all Lazarus, dead to the spirit of love, but if we listen we will be able to rise from the tomb were our selfishness has brought us, to emerge from that place of loneliness and alienation wherein we are working contrary to the will of God.

We can then embrace the light and move forward in God’s love.



I Shall Put My Spirit in You, and You Will Live

The Lord says this: I am now going to open your graves; I mean to raise you from your graves, my people, and lead you back to the soil of Israel. And you will know that I am the Lord, when I open your graves and raise you from your graves, my people. And I shall put my spirit in you, and you will live, and I shall resettle you on your own soil; and you will know that I, the Lord, have said and done this – it is the Lord who speaks.


Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 129(130) ©

With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.

Out of the depths I cry to you, O Lord,
  Lord, hear my voice!
O let your ears be attentive
  to the voice of my pleading.

With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.

If you, O Lord, should mark our guilt,
  Lord, who would survive?
But with you is found forgiveness:
  for this we revere you.

With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.

My soul is waiting for the Lord.
  I count on his word.
My soul is longing for the Lord
  more than watchman for daybreak.
(Let the watchman count on daybreak
  and Israel on the Lord.)

With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.

Because with the Lord there is mercy
  and fullness of redemption,
Israel indeed he will redeem
  from all its iniquity.

With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.


Second Reading – Romans 8:8-11 ©

The Spirit of Him who Raised Jesus from the Dead is Living in ou

People who are interested only in unspiritual things can never be pleasing to God. Your interests, however, are not in the unspiritual, but in the spiritual, since the Spirit of God has made his home in you. In fact, unless you possessed the Spirit of Christ you would not belong to him. Though your body may be dead it is because of sin, but if Christ is in you then your spirit is life itself because you have been justified; and if the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead is living in you, then he who raised Jesus from the dead will give life to your own mortal bodies through his Spirit living in you.



Glory and praise to you, O Christ!

I am the resurrection and the life, says the Lord;
whoever believes in me will never die.

Glory and praise to you, O Christ!


The Gospel According to John 11:1 - 45 ©

I Am the Resurrection and the Life

There was a man named Lazarus who lived in the village of Bethany with the two sisters, Mary and Martha, and he was ill. It was the same Mary, the sister of the sick man Lazarus, who anointed the Lord with ointment and wiped his feet with her hair. The sisters sent this message to Jesus, ‘Lord, the man you love is ill.’ On receiving the message, Jesus said, ‘This sickness will end not in death but in God’s glory, and through it the Son of God will be glorified.’

Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus, yet when he heard that Lazarus was ill he stayed where he was for two more days before saying to the disciples, ‘Let us go to Judaea.’ The disciples said, ‘Rabbi, it is not long since the Jews wanted to stone you; are you going back again?’ Jesus replied:

‘Are there not twelve hours in the day?

A man can walk in the daytime without stumbling because he has the light of this world to see by; but if he walks at night he stumbles, because there is no light to guide him.’
He said that and then added, ‘Our friend Lazarus is resting, I am going to wake him.’ The disciples said to him, ‘Lord, if he is able to rest he is sure to get better.’ The phrase Jesus used referred to the death of Lazarus, but they thought that by ‘rest’ he meant ‘sleep’, so Jesus put it plainly, ‘Lazarus is dead; and for your sake I am glad I was not there because now you will believe. But let us go to him.’ Then Thomas – known as the Twin – said to the other disciples, ‘Let us go too, and die with him.’

On arriving, Jesus found that Lazarus had been in the tomb for four days already. Bethany is only about two miles from Jerusalem, and many Jews had come to Martha and Mary to sympathise with them over their brother. When Martha heard that Jesus had come she went to meet him. Mary remained sitting in the house. Martha said to Jesus, ‘If you had been here, my brother would not have died, but I know that, even now, whatever you ask of God, he will grant you.’ ‘Your brother’ said Jesus to her ‘will rise again.’ Martha said, ‘I know he will rise again at the resurrection on the last day.’ Jesus said:

‘I am the resurrection and the life. If anyone believes in me, even though he dies he will live, and whoever lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?’ ‘Yes, Lord,’ she said ‘I believe that you are the Christ, the Son of God, the one who was to come into this world.’

When she had said this, she went and called her sister Mary, saying in a low voice, ‘The Master is here and wants to see you.’ Hearing this, Mary got up quickly and went to him. Jesus had not yet come into the village; he was still at the place where Martha had met him. When the Jews who were in the house sympathising with Mary saw her get up so quickly and go out, they followed her, thinking that she was going to the tomb to weep there.

Mary went to Jesus, and as soon as she saw him she threw herself at his feet, saying, ‘Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died.’ At the sight of her tears, and those of the Jews who followed her, Jesus said in great distress, with a sigh that came straight from the heart, ‘Where have you put him?’ They said, ‘Lord, come and see.’ Jesus wept; and the Jews said, ‘See how much he loved him!’ But there were some who remarked, ‘He opened the eyes of the blind man, could he not have prevented this man’s death?’ Still sighing, Jesus reached the tomb: it was a cave with a stone to close the opening. Jesus said, ‘Take the stone away.’ Martha said to him, ‘Lord, by now he will smell; this is the fourth day.’ Jesus replied, ‘Have I not told you that if you believe you will see the glory of God?’ So they took away the stone. Then Jesus lifted up his eyes and said:

‘Father, I thank you for hearing my prayer. I knew indeed that you always hear me, but I speak for the sake of all these who stand round me, so that they may believe it was you who sent me.’ When he had said this, he cried in a loud voice, ‘Lazarus, here! Come out!’ The dead man came out, his feet and hands bound with bands of stuff and a cloth round his face. Jesus said to them, ‘Unbind him, let him go free.’

Many of the Jews who had come to visit Mary and had seen what he did believed in him.


The Fifth Sunday of Lent (Year A)

Saturday, March 28, 2020

Listen - Editorial, The Week in Review


Analysis, Commentary, Opinion
03.29.2020

Listen


My sensei always use to tell that we have to be rich enough to pay attention.

Pay attention to what is going on around us, look beyond the tip of your nose. Listen to the warning we are being given, comply with the safety measures that are being recommended.

The sooner we all get on the same page, acting in concert with one another the sooner we get through this mess.

Be mindful, the risks you take go far beyond yourself and your family, the COVID-19 virus, if you come in contact with it, will spread out from you, well beyond your sphere of influence.

Limit your exposure, practice social and physical distancing. Do it for your sake, and for the sake of your family, yes do it for those reasons, but do it for everyone else’s families as well, do it for the doctors and nurses and emergency workers who are risking their lives for our sake.

They are heroes, honor their sacrifice.

Listen, and don’t listen.

Don’t listen to the selfish voices around you, correct those , do it gently, but correct those who complain about their need to be with people, to run around the lake, to have a drink with a friend, because they do not want to stay secluded.

You are not being asked to risk your life, to take up arms and go to war, you are only being asked to spend a couple of weeks, or so with yourself.

You can do this, and the sooner we all do it together the sooner we get through this and the sooner life will return to something we recognize as normal.

Do not listen to the conspiracy theorists trying to distract you with their colorful ideas about who dunnit and why, those people are not trying to help you adjust to the circumstances or see our way through it.

Listen to the doctors, listen to the scientists, listen to the men and women in the hospitals, do not listen to the politicians, the media pundits, or the televangelists, trying to make a dollar off your suffering.

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Shining


A beautiful smile
A flash of brightness, darling
Behind soft red lips

We dance in our dreams
Float, waltzing with the Sandman
Asleep and shining

A terrible smile
A flash of brightness, daring
Sharp-white, pretty teeth

Light up the heavens
The divine constellation
Jewels in the night

Sunday, March 22, 2020

A Homily - The Fourth Sunday of Lent (Year A)


Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 22(23) ©
Second Reading – Ephesians 5:8-14 ©
Gospel Acclamation – John 8:12
The Gospel According to John – John 9:1 - 41 ©

(NJB)

The Fourth Sunday of Lent (Year A)


The readings for today begin with a proper myth. However, a religion purporting to have been founded by the Spirit of truth, cannot be rooted in this kind of mythology.

It is too easy for the reader to overlook the wisdom predicated in this statement: “God does not look at the man but at the heart,” and focus on the inconsequential issues presented in the reading: “The spirit of God seized David and remained with him thereafter.”

Be mindful!

There was nothing at all special about David, and God, the creator of the universe, God is not a respecter of persons. God does not intervene in the course of human events, God is not a kingmaker.

All of us exist within God, and without God not one of us would be. God carried all of us into existence, seized us from out of nothing and carried us into the light, and from the first moment of our being God has been with us, as God is with everyone.

Listen to the psalmist.

God, the creator of the universe, God is the shepherd of all.

If we walk in the ways of God, then we will be as a shepherd to our sisters and brothers.

Know this, our time in this world is not the end of all things. It transitory. If we are hungry, we are hungry only for a time. If we thirst, it is but for a moment. In times of scarcity we must show our generosity.

Give to those in need. Trust in God and find your peace.

It is not only because God loves you that God guides you. It is for the God’s own sake that God blesses you. God blesses and guides us so that we may in turn may be a guide and blessing to others.

The power of death and sin are temporary, it is only God that endures forever, and we are the children of God.

The divine spirit dwells within us.

If God has set a table before you, share it with the world, turn your adversaries into loved ones.

Consider these words from the apostle; reflect on their meaning:

What is exposed in the light will become light!

The Gospel promises a time when their will be no darkness, when light will cover everything, and everything will be transformed by the light, into light.

We have a choice to make; we can wait for grace to break into our lives, or we can give up our shameful ways, our greed and jealousy, our miserliness and hatreds.

We came give them up and walk into the light on our own.

Let the spirit of grace guide you.

Be mindful!

We are all walking in the way, and the way does not exclude anyone. We are all moving inexorably toward God, the divine source of all being.

Be mindful of the Gospel reading for today!

The intrigue that is presented here casts a pall over the best parts of the Gospel.

Handle it with care.

When the good news of the way is interwoven with internecine conflicts, legalisms and partisanship, its brightness is diminished.

We do best when keep the preaching of Jesus to this core teaching:

The way is light, I am the way, Christ is a light in the world.

Follow it!

In the lighted way the blind will see, even those who have lived in perpetual darkness will see clearly.

Believe it!

The Gospel is hope. Any part of the Gospel that detracts from that hope, is preaching that does not originate in the teaching of Jesus Christ. It is not a part of the lighted way.

Reject it!


First Reading – 1 Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 10-13 ©

David is Anointed by Samuel

The Lord said to Samuel, ‘Fill your horn with oil and go. I am sending you to Jesse of Bethlehem, for I have chosen myself a king among his sons.’ When Samuel arrived, he caught sight of Eliab and thought, ‘Surely the Lord’s anointed stands there before him,’ but the Lord said to Samuel, ‘Take no notice of his appearance or his height, for I have rejected him: God does not see as man sees: man looks at appearances but the Lord looks at the heart.’ Jesse presented his seven sons to Samuel, but Samuel said to Jesse, ‘The Lord has not chosen these.’ He then asked Jesse, ‘Are these all the sons you have?’ He answered, ‘There is still one left, the youngest; he is out looking after the sheep.’ Then Samuel said to Jesse, ‘Send for him; we will not sit down to eat until he comes.’ Jesse had him sent for, a boy of fresh complexion, with fine eyes and pleasant bearing. The Lord said, ‘Come, anoint him, for this is the one.’ At this, Samuel took the horn of oil and anointed him where he stood with his brothers; and the spirit of the Lord seized on David and stayed with him from that day on.


Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 22(23) ©

The Lord is my shepherd: there is nothing I shall want.

The Lord is my shepherd;
  there is nothing I shall want.
Fresh and green are the pastures
  where he gives me repose.
Near restful waters he leads me,
  to revive my drooping spirit.

The Lord is my shepherd: there is nothing I shall want.

He guides me along the right path;
  he is true to his name.
If I should walk in the valley of darkness
  no evil would I fear.
You are there with your crook and your staff;
  with these you give me comfort.

The Lord is my shepherd: there is nothing I shall want.

You have prepared a banquet for me
  in the sight of my foes.
My head you have anointed with oil;
  my cup is overflowing.

The Lord is my shepherd: there is nothing I shall want.

Surely goodness and kindness shall follow me
  all the days of my life.
In the Lord’s own house shall I dwell
  for ever and ever.

The Lord is my shepherd: there is nothing I shall want.


Second Reading – Ephesians 5:8-14 ©

Anything Exposed by the Light Will Turn into Light

You were darkness once, but now you are light in the Lord; be like children of light, for the effects of the light are seen in complete goodness and right living and truth. Try to discover what the Lord wants of you, having nothing to do with the futile works of darkness but exposing them by contrast. The things which are done in secret are things that people are ashamed even to speak of; but anything exposed by the light will be illuminated and anything illuminated turns into light. That is why it is said:

Wake up from your sleep, rise from the dead, and Christ will shine on you.



Glory to you, O Christ, you are the Word of God!

I am the light of the world, says the Lord;
whoever follows me will have the light of life.

Glory to you, O Christ, you are the Word of God!



The Blind Man Went Off and Washed Himself, and Came Away with His Sight Restored

As Jesus went along, he saw a man who had been blind from birth. His disciples asked him, ‘Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, for him to have been born blind?’ ‘Neither he nor his parents sinned,’ Jesus answered ‘he was born blind so that the works of God might be displayed in him.

‘As long as the day lasts
I must carry out the work of the one who sent me;
the night will soon be here when no one can work.
As long as I am in the world
I am the light of the world.’

Having said this, he spat on the ground, made a paste with the spittle, put this over the eyes of the blind man, and said to him, ‘Go and wash in the Pool of Siloam’ (a name that means ‘sent’). So the blind man went off and washed himself, and came away with his sight restored.

His neighbours and people who earlier had seen him begging said, ‘Isn’t this the man who used to sit and beg?’ Some said, ‘Yes, it is the same one.’ Others said, ‘No, he only looks like him.’ The man himself said, ‘I am the man.’ So they said to him, ‘Then how do your eyes come to be open?’ ‘The man called Jesus’ he answered ‘made a paste, daubed my eyes with it and said to me, “Go and wash at Siloam”; so I went, and when I washed I could see.’ They asked, ‘Where is he?’ ‘I don’t know’ he answered.

  They brought the man who had been blind to the Pharisees. It had been a sabbath day when Jesus made the paste and opened the man’s eyes, so when the Pharisees asked him how he had come to see, he said, ‘He put a paste on my eyes, and I washed, and I can see.’ Then some of the Pharisees said, ‘This man cannot be from God: he does not keep the sabbath.’ Others said, ‘How could a sinner produce signs like this?’ And there was disagreement among them. So they spoke to the blind man again, ‘What have you to say about him yourself, now that he has opened your eyes?’ ‘He is a prophet’ replied the man. However, the Jews would not believe that the man had been blind and had gained his sight, without first sending for his parents and asking them, ‘Is this man really your son who you say was born blind? If so, how is it that he is now able to see?’ His parents answered, ‘We know he is our son and we know he was born blind, but we do not know how it is that he can see now, or who opened his eyes. He is old enough: let him speak for himself.’ His parents spoke like this out of fear of the Jews, who had already agreed to expel from the synagogue anyone who should acknowledge Jesus as the Christ. This was why his parents said, ‘He is old enough; ask him.’

  So the Jews again sent for the man and said to him, ‘Give glory to God! For our part, we know that this man is a sinner.’ The man answered, ‘I don’t know if he is a sinner; I only know that I was blind and now I can see.’ They said to him, ‘What did he do to you? How did he open your eyes?’ He replied, ‘I have told you once and you wouldn’t listen. Why do you want to hear it all again? Do you want to become his disciples too?’ At this they hurled abuse at him: ‘You can be his disciple,’ they said ‘we are disciples of Moses: we know that God spoke to Moses, but as for this man, we do not know where he comes from.’ The man replied, ‘Now here is an astonishing thing! He has opened my eyes, and you don’t know where he comes from! We know that God doesn’t listen to sinners, but God does listen to men who are devout and do his will. Ever since the world began it is unheard of for anyone to open the eyes of a man who was born blind; if this man were not from God, he couldn’t do a thing.’ ‘Are you trying to teach us,’ they replied ‘and you a sinner through and through, since you were born!’ And they drove him away.

  Jesus heard they had driven him away, and when he found him he said to him, ‘Do you believe in the Son of Man?’ ‘Sir,’ the man replied ‘tell me who he is so that I may believe in him.’ Jesus said, ‘You are looking at him; he is speaking to you.’ The man said, ‘Lord, I believe’, and worshipped him.

  Jesus said:

‘It is for judgement
that I have come into this world,
so that those without sight may see
and those with sight turn blind.’

Hearing this, some Pharisees who were present said to him, ‘We are not blind, surely?’ Jesus replied:

‘Blind? If you were,
you would not be guilty,
but since you say, “We see,”
your guilt remains.’



Saturday, March 21, 2020

Stay at Home - Editorial, The Week in Review


Analysis, Commentary, Opinion
03.20.2020

Stay at Home

I had to do some work today.

I am grateful that I still have some work to do.

It will come to an end in a couple of days and then I will be twiddling my thumbs along with everyone else.

My work took me into Linden Hills, and I drove around The Lake, Bde Maka Ska on my way home.

I was stunned by the long line of cars at the stop light, the foot traffic in Linden Hills, the crowds of people walking around the Lake, as with the jammed-up traffic all up and down 36th Street.

I understand that it is kind of a nice day, and a lot of people are feeling exhausted simply because they have been cooped up.

Seriously though, I have to wonder how many people are paying attention to the news. Who is listening to the recommendation on social distancing?

Is anyone paying attention to the fact that New York, California and Illinois, have put mandatory shelter in place orders into effect?

Why wait for the numbers here to get as bad as they are getting in other parts of the country, why not just stay home if you don’t have a reason to be out?

Just take a little bit of boredom and frustration for the team.

All of you people who were out walking with their families around the lake, is it just that you can’t imagine that something terrible could befall you or someone you love?

This virus is worse than a honey badger, and it just doesn’t give a f*** about you, or anyone.

Stay at home.





Tuesday, March 17, 2020

The Feast of Saint Patrick – Patron Saint of Ireland


Today is the feast of Saint Patrick, today we celebrate his sainthood, and the ascendance to heaven of a British man, of Roman heritage, who lived sometime between the fourth and fifth centuries CE.

Patrick is the Patron Saint of Ireland, but he was not Irish at all, he was a Roman of the Patrician class, from a family of rank, and privilege.  

Patrick (Patricius) is credited with converting the people of Erin to faith in the Universal Church, the Apostolic Church of Jesus Christ, in so doing he separated the Celtic people from their Gaelic traditions, and subordinated them to the Catholic Church in Rome.

It is no wonder that he was named a saint for this, Patricius.

He won with the Word what could not be accomplished by through war, by sword and spear, by fire and blood.

It should be noted that Saint Patrick has never been canonized, or even beatified not by any Pope. Therefore Patrick is not officially a Saint of the Catholic Church, and nevertheless, he is recognized in the annals of the Saints of the Church of England, I hope that all my Irish kinfolk appreciate the irony of this.

It is worthy of song.

History tells us that Patrick was a humble man, a rare quality for those of rank. History also tells us that he proofed the plan of spreading the faith by converting Irish chieftains first. Patrick was a politician of great skill. Every missionary who followed him, emulated this method.

He spread the faith, he established churches and he earned the rank of Apostle, by popular acclamation.

History tells us that his mother was a relative of Saint Martin of Tours, the patron Saint of Soldiers, Saint Martin of the Sword whose biography was written by Pope Saint Gregory the Great, but we know that was a work of pure fiction. Saint Martin never lived, even so, his story gave license for Christians to become soldiers, to serve in the army, and as such it brought the Roman legions into the fold.

Patrick was said to have had “heroic piety,” praying day and night, in the mountains and the woods, he prayed through the rain, and through storms of snow and ice, he should be the patron saint of post men if this were true, but then again…all hagiographies are lies.

His story tells us that he spent six years as a captive and servant to a Celtic Chieftain, the Druid named Milchu in Dalriada, where he mastered the language of the common folk and learned all of their stories.

However, if you appreciate history you will know that it is much more likely that he fled his home to wander abroad in order to escape the duties that were expected of him as the son of a nobleman. Such departures were common in his time, they were referred to as the “flight of the curiales.” Patrick was no captive at all, he was a boy running from his responsibilities.

Rather than being taken captive it is more likely that he paid for asylum in Milchu’s house, and  that he paid for the services of tutors to help him learn the language.

The Druids were great teachers and oral historians that much is true.

The story of his escape (if it was in fact an escape from servitude), and subsequent journey were of his own account. He cast the entire experience in dramatic, even biblical terms, they served both to cover up his crime of abnegation, and also to establish his fame.

It is said that Patrick escaped from Milchu and then fled to the mainland of Europe where he entered the priesthood and became a missionary. On his return to Ireland however, the first place he went was to his former home in Dalriada. Where, after some period of conflict with his former captor (or patron) and the affectation of some miracles on Patrick’s part, Milchu immolated himself to make way for the upstart, throwing himself on a fire after burning the collected scrolls and mysteries of his people.

This event may be seen in metaphorical terms as Milchu offering himself as a human sacrifice, at the foundation of the church in Ireland.

That’s how Patrick wrote it.

In reality. the whole episode denotes the ritual destruction of the Celtic people in favor of the ascending Romano-British invaders.

On Easter Sunday, 433 a conflict of will ensued between Patrick and the Celtic Arch-Druid Lochru, historians mythologized it as a battle of divine forces like the contest between Moses and the Egyptians, or Elijah and priests of Baal, and it ended with Saint Patrick magically hurling Lochru into the air, and breaking him to pieces on a sharp rock.

It was another ritual murder at the foundation of the Irish Church, another human sacrifice to be sure. There is no other way to read this, it was a good old-fashioned Roman slaughter.

On a side note, while speaking of his vaunted magic powers, not to be outdone by Jesus, this same Patrick was said to have been able to raise the dead.

It should be noted the Columbanus, who was the most significant representative of the Irish Catholic Church after the Dark Ages, who lived and wrote and sent missionaries from Ireland to Continental Europe, building Churches and founding religious communities, makes no mention of Saint Patrick in his writing, not once, not anywhere, Columbanus tells us that the Church in Ireland was founded by a man named Palladius.

The entire legend of Saint Patrick is little more than a myth designed to subordinate the Irish heart to a British noble of Roman descent, and a fictitious one at that.

Be mindful when you celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day!


Revised 2020.03.17

Given First 2018.03.17